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Types of stool tests for colon cancer

Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps - National

A new study published in the journal Gut examines the accuracy of FIT as a predictive tool for colorectal cancer. FIT works by detecting blood in the stool, specifically by detecting the globin portion of the haemoglobin molecule found in red blood cells. This study was conducted across 50 NHS hospitals in England There are other stool-based exams on the market too. One is stool DNA, or sDNA. It's another at-home stool test ordered by a doctor. The test looks for blood and abnormal DNA in the stool that may..

Conditions That Mimic Colon Cancer . Changes in stool or bowel movements may be suggestive of colon cancer—particularly if you have risk factors for the disease—but there are numerous other explanations for these symptoms. These conditions are far more common but can mimic many of the signs and symptoms of colon cancer. These include Stool tests are done to look for blood in the stool, since cancer and polyps in the colon are more likely to bleed than normal colon tissue. One type of stool test, the FIT-DNA test, checks the stool for blood and genetic changes in DNA that could be signs of cancer

There are two main types of stool tests to choose from. A fecal occult blood test (FOBT) detects the presence of blood in your feces. The second type, a stool DNA test, detects the presence of genetic material from polyps and cancerous tumors Stool tests check for this hidden (occult) blood, which you can't see with your eyes. There are 2 types of stool tests used in Canada to screen for colorectal cancer: Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) uses a chemical reaction on a paper card to find traces of blood in the stool. Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) uses specific. Our stools hold a lot of information about our health, including the progression of diseases such as colon cancer. There are three types of stool-based tests approved by the Food and Drug Administration: Guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) Fecal immunochemical test (FIT One way to look for signs of colorectal cancer is to see if there are microscopic amounts of blood in the stool using a high-sensitivity fecal occult blood test, or FOBT. Occult, in this case,.. A fecal immunochemical test (FIT) screens for colon cancer by detecting blood in the stool. Unlike a fecal occult blood test, you don't have to follow a special diet beforehand. FIT reacts to a part of the hemoglobin molecule (a protein found in red blood cells). If an abnormality is detected, you may need to have a colonoscopy to remove it

The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is a screening test for colon cancer. It tests for hidden blood in the stool, which can be an early sign of cancer. FIT only detects human blood from the lower intestines. Medicines and food do not interfere with the test. So it tends to be more accurate and have fewer false positive results than other tests Five types of tests are used to screen for colorectal cancer: Fecal occult blood test A fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is a test to check stool (solid waste) for blood that can only be seen with a microscope. A small sample of stool is placed on a special card or in a special container and returned to the doctor or laboratory for testing Stool tests involve testing a sample of feces for hidden blood in the stool. These test only detect the presence of blood and do not indicate what is bleeding or from what part of the intestine is bleeding. Since large polyps or colon cancers often bleed these test can be used to detect a possible problem Stool DNA test This type of stool test detects abnormal DNA, that occur normally because of colon polyps or colon cancer as well as traces of occult blood, in your stool sample. A stool DNA test is a screening test for colon cancer and precancerous polyps for people who are not experiencing any signs and symptoms associated with it

Colonoscopy has long been touted as the gold standard for colon cancer screening, recommended for all adults starting at age 50. With colon cancer expected to kill more than 49,000 Americans this. The fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is a lab test used to check stool samples for hidden (occult) blood. Occult blood in the stool may indicate colon cancer or polyps in the colon or rectum — though not all cancers or polyps bleed FIT and Cologuard tests performed using stool samples are not as effective at identifying the large precancerous polyps that lead to colon cancer. FIT and Cologuard tests are more effective than doing no testing at all. How accurate is stool test for colon cancer? There are two types of stool tests for colon cancer Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to reduce CRC incidence and mortality and is widely recommended. However, despite the demonstrated benefits of screening and ongoing efforts to improve screening rates, a large percentage of the population remains unscreened. Noninvasive stool based t Testing yourself for colon cancer is now easier and more accurate. Cologuard is a do-it-yourself kit that allows you to collect your stool sample in the privacy of your home. The FDA approved it.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests Sigmoidoscopy

  1. MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A newer type of test that looks for hidden blood in the stool is an effective way to screen for colon cancer, a research review suggests. The tests, called.
  2. There are several types of stool tests. The type of stool test used depends on why the test is being done and what the doctor is looking for. A gFOBT (guaiac-based fecal occult blood test) uses a chemical reaction on a paper card to find traces of blood in the stool that you can't see
  3. The NHS use stool tests to detect or assess a huge number of conditions that we can't fully cover here. Some of the most common are: colon cancer. inflammatory bowel disease (like ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) an acute infection with pathogenic bacteria. The most common pathogenic bacteria include
  4. How It Is Done. There are different types of home tests. The companies that make the test kits provide instructions. To get accurate results, carefully follow the instructions i
  5. Types of colorectal cancer screening tests . If a colorectal cancer screening test conjures up images of colonoscopies and bowel prep strategies, you may be able to breathe a sigh of relief: The.
  6. Symptoms can include blood in your stool, suddenly losing weight or ongoing pains and aches. It's important to get regular screenings for colorectal cancer if you are between ages 50 and 75. These tests can find polyps, or abnormal growths in the tissue, before they become cancerous, CDC reports
  7. INTRODUCTION. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide[] with 1.36 million people affected globally, accounting for nearly 10% of cancers[].It remains the second leading cause of cancer in the United States and worldwide[1,3].Due to its slow progression from detectable precancerous lesions and to the much better.

Stool tests to check for infections, the presence of blood, and other diseases. The diagnosis involves a pattern of symptoms, which includes abdominal pain and two or more of the following symptoms Stool tests check for signs of colorectal cancer in your poop, by looking at either blood present in the sample or mutations in the DNA found in your stool. Visual exams, like colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy and CT colonography, get a glimpse at the inside of your colon to look for the signs of colorectal cancer There are five types of tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer: fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, and DNA stool test. Learn more about these and other tests in this expert-reviewed summary Tests for blood in the stool can consistently detect colon cancer when used on an annual basis, and they are effective even in the second, third and fourth years of screening, a new study says. The researchers said these findings suggest that the stool test could be a reasonable screening alternative to colonoscopy -- currently considered the. Background & aims: Evaluation of molecular alterations in fecal DNA is a potential, noninvasive, alternative tool for the detection of colorectal cancer. We analyzed a large panel of molecular alterations involved in tumor transformation and progression to define their single diagnostic contribution in terms of sensitivity, cost, and time required to carry out the different tests

The WTC Health Program offers three types of colon cancer screening. Initial testing might look for small amounts of blood in your stool. A second type of test allows doctors to look inside the rectum and lower colon, while a third type of test examines the entire length of the colon This test checks for blood and specific DNA in a stool sample — issues that could indicate the presence of colon cancer. A doctor may use a stool DNA test alongside FIT. If the test detects any. Lifestyle-related factors such as diet, weight, exercise, smoking and alcohol use may also put you at risk for colon cancer. 3. Humana members can visit an in-network doctor to schedule regular doctor visits and health screenings. Types of colon cancer tests. Stool tests—There are several different options available

Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives | VitalSigns | CDC

Types of at-home colon cancer tests At-home screening tests have been around in one form or another for more than 20 years, says Dr. Robbins. Three Food and Drug Administration-approved tests are.

By Linda Carroll. When it comes to colon cancer screening, an annual stool test may be as effective as colonoscopy for people who don't have risk factors for the disease, a new study suggests. A fecal immunochemical test (FIT) also screens for colon cancer by detecting blood in the stool. Unlike more traditional fecal occult blood testing, you don't have to follow a special diet before the test. FIT reacts to a part of the hemoglobin molecule (a protein found in red blood cells). If an abnormality is detected, you may need to. Everlywell's colon cancer testing is a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) which requires a swab-sized stool sample to detect occult (hidden) blood in the stool. The absence of blood in your sample will not rule out colon cancer. When your test kit arrives, you can register it online using the unique ID number that comes in the box

Lab Test Options For Diagnosing Colorectal Cancer CTC

The three types of at-home colorectal cancer tests are: Guaiac FOBT (gFOBT). This test uses a chemical to detect a component of hemoglobin, which is a blood protein in the stool The test looks for tiny traces of blood in the stool, a way of screening people for colon cancer. Over that time, about 2 percent of the people, about 2,700 of them, had positive tests Stool Tests and Cologuard. Stool-based screening is an appropriate option for certain patients, such as those who are considered average-risk and refuse or are unable to have colonoscopy. Two types of stool tests that are commonly used are the guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) and the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) Stool DNA tests. This test analyzes the DNA from a person's stool sample to look for cancer. It uses changes in the DNA that occur in polyps and cancers to find out if a colonoscopy should be done. Colorectal cancer screening recommendations (updated 05/2021) Different organizations have made different recommendations for colorectal cancer.

You use the kit to test your stool for blood or DNA (or both) from colorectal cancer. Some types of stool sample tests should be done once a year. Other types should be done at least every 3 years. Stool DNA testing is another type of non-invasive test to check for colorectal cancer. It looks for certain DNA or gene changes that often get into the stool and are sometimes found in pre-cancerous growths and cancer cells. It also checks for blood in the stool, which can be a sign of cancer

Stool tests are done to look for blood in the stool, since cancer in the colon or polyps in the colon are more likely to bleed than normal colon tissue. One type of stool test, the sDNA test, checks the stool for blood and genetic changes in DNA that could be signs of cancer Two ways toget Cologuard. Cologuard is intended to screen adults 45 years of age and older who are at average risk for colorectal cancer by detecting certain DNA markers and blood in the stool. Do not use if you have had adenomas, have inflammatory bowel disease and certain hereditary syndromes, or a personal or family history of colorectal cancer A recently published review of data from thirty-one colon cancer screening studies shows that an annual at-home stool test called a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) may be as effective as a colonoscopy at detecting cancer in average-risk adults. While the data review adds support for colon cancer screening with inexpensive and non-invasive stool tests, authors of the study recommend patients. Diagnosing Colon Cancer. A professional diagnosis is the best way to determine the type of colon cancer that you may have, which can then determine the treatment options available. Tests and procedures for colon cancer screenings vary, but they usually start with a basic physical examination FIT tests are used to identify the presence of blood in the stool. Blood in the stool is a symptom of colon cancer. It is not always visible to the naked eye, but identifying it may help you to indicate cancerous or precancerous cells in the body. It's important to note from the offset that an FIT test won't offer a definitive diagnosis.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests CD

A blood test may also check for substances (called tumor markers) that colon cancer cells make. Stool-based tests: Doctors may use stool-based tests for colon cancer screening or diagnosis. For some tests, a lab checks a stool sample for signs of colon cancer, such as blood. Other tests analyze the DNA in stool for possible cancer A: Two types of home stool tests are promoted as easy, noninvasive screening tools for colorectal cancer. The older hemoccult test finds hidden blood in the stool. Its accuracy in detecting cancer varies but can be as high as 70 percent. However, the hemoccult test cannot detect colorectal polyps

Colon Cancer and Rectal Cancer Screening: What Are My Options

Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) Your doctor may recommend a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) to screen for colon cancer. FOBT is a test that checks the stool (solid waste) for blood, using a microscope. A small sample of stool is placed on a special card or in a special container and returned to the doctor or laboratory for testing.. While blood in the stool can be an early sign of colon cancer. In the past, the most common test looked for evidence of blood. Newer, more sensitive testing can now look for altered DNA that can be seen with colon cancer and certain types of polyps. Stool testing is done every one to three years depending on the type of test. There are many types of home stool testing kits Types of tests for CRC screening include stool-based testing to detect either hemoglobin in blood that may be coming from a lesion or DNA alterations suggestive of malignancy; direct visualization with endoscopy, either with a scope that allows for biopsy and lesion removal at the time of the test or with a tiny camera that visualizes lesions. There are 3 types of stool tests: Hemoccult test; Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) Cologuard ; The hemoccult test and FIT look for blood in the stool and need to be repeated every year. Cologuard identifies blood in the stool and DNA mutations that can be an early indicator for colorectal cancer or advanced precancerous polyps The fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is used to find blood in the feces, or stool. Blood in the stool may be a sign of colorectal cancer or other problems, such as ulcers or polyps. These are growths that develop on the inner wall of the colon and rectum. Types of fecal occult blood tests. Currently, there are 2 types of FOBTs: Guaiac-based FOBT

A fecal occult blood test is used to detect hidden blood in the stool that is not easily visible. 5 The presence of blood in the stool indicates that there is some type of bleeding occurring in the colon, but there are many conditions that can cause bleeding in the digestive tract, including diverticulitis, polyps (small growths), colon cancer. The novel multimodal FirstSightCRC test has shown promise in identifying colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as precancerous polyps and advanced adenomas, said Shai Friedland, MD, who added that results from the blood-based assay can inform whether a patient should undergo a colonoscopy Stool Sample Tests. Your doctor can prescribe an at-home stool test. You use the kit to test your stool for blood or DNA (or both) from colorectal cancer. Some types of stool sample tests should be done once a year. Other types should be done at least every 3 years, or more often if your doctor recommends It's important to pay attention to how your gut is functioning because it might be trying to tell you something. Here's a list of symptoms that colon cancer might cause: 7. Diarrhea, constipation or change in bowel movements. Rectal bleeding or bloody stool Conditions like damage to intestines, ulcerative colitis, a tear in the rectum, hemorrhoids, anal fissures, colon cancer, etc. can cause blood in stool. Inflammation of the intestines or a.

There are two different types of screening tests to rule out colon cancer: Stool-based tests Colon cancer screening > Stool-based tests. It relies on checking the stools to check for any histological or biochemical sign of cancer. It is not invasive but needs to be performed more often to make it accurate Colon cancer forms inside the large intestine, which is roughly five and a half feet long. The first five feet of the large intestine is called the colon. The rectum makes up the last six inches of the large intestine. Cancers found in the two organs are often grouped together as colorectal cancer

Thankfully, this type of colon cancer screening can find trace amounts of blood in your stools. This stool-based test is an accurate means of detecting possible signs of polyps or colorectal cancer. These tests are convenient in that they can be performed at home and are less invasive than a colonoscopy A stool test is one of many tests used to look for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer affects the large intestine ( colon) and the rectum. Stool tests look for signs of blood or cancer in a stool sample. Stool tests include: Fecal immunochemical test (FIT). Guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT). Stool DNA test, also called FIT-DNA Several types of tests on a sample of your stool can detect signs of colorectal cancer: Fecal immunochemical test: FIT tests for hidden blood in the stool, which can be an early sign of cancer. FIT tests should be done yearly. Fecal occult blood test: FOBT detects blood in the stool, which may be a sign of colorectal cancer, ulcers or polyps. This test does not require any sedation. However, the same type of bowel preparation needed for a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy is needed 1-2 days before the exam. Stool tests. Stool tests look for possible signs of colorectal cancer—such as blood or abnormal DNA—in stool samples. There are several different tests available Colorectal cancer screening tests saves lives This early detection may prevent polyps from becoming cancer and could jumpstart treatment earlier, when it is most effective. Though it is usually recommended to start getting screened at age 45, you may need to be screened earlier depending on your family's health history and risk factors

Can Stool Tests Really Detect Colon Cancer? - Health

The fecal immunochemical test (FIT), also called an immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT), is a newer kind of stool test that also detects occult (hidden) blood in the stool. This detection is important because it can be a sign of precancerous polyps or colorectal cancer. Blood vessels at the surface of larger polyps or cancers are. Types of screening tests. Several tests can be used to screen for colorectal cancer. Some of these tests can also find colorectal polyps. Screening tests to find colorectal polyps and cancer. Colonoscopy. This test looks at your rectum and your entire colon. It uses a colonoscope, which is a long, lighted tube with a small video camera on the end Stool DNA testing, also called the FIT DNA test, is one method of screening for colon cancer. Colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women. Testing for colon cancer before symptoms develop ( screening) reduces your risk for this cancer. Colon cancer grows slowly, so finding the cancer early means a better chance. Similarly, screening tests can find colorectal cancer early. There are two categories of test to screen for polyps or colon cancer. The first category is stool-based tests and the second one is visual-based tests. Here are all you need to know about both categories of screening tests, including their functions, as well as the pros and cons of.

How accurate are stool tests for colon cancer? - Medical

Fecal Occult Blood Test: During fecal occult blood test for colorectal cancer screening detection, a bit of stool is tested on a chemically treated paper. The presence of iron in the stool surfaces in this test. Experts recommend avoidance of red meat three days prior to the fecal occult blood test Blood usually, but not always, can be detected through a fecal occult (hidden) blood test, in which samples of stool are submitted to a lab for detection of blood. Symptoms of colon cancer may not be present or be minimal and overlooked until it becomes more severe. Cancer screening tests for colon cancer thus are important in individuals 50. Two categories of screening options are available: stool-based testing and visual exam. Speak to your doctor to find out which test is right for you. Stool-based Tests. These tests require the patient to collect and mail-in a stool sample using an at-home kit. Currently, there are three types of stool tests approved by the FDA

Dreading a Colonoscopy? Other Tests Are Just as Effective

Stool tests involve checking your stool for tiny amounts of blood or other signs of colorectal cancer. Most stool tests need to be done once a year. These tests can usually be done in your home. There are different types of stool tests: Fecal immunochemical test (FIT). This test checks for signs of blood in the stool { consumer: A stool test is one of many tests used to look for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer affects the large intestine ( colon) and the rectum. Stool tests look for signs of blood or cancer in a stool sample. Stool tests include: Fecal immunochemical test (FIT). Guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) Two types of tests, fecal occult blood testing (also called guaiac testing, or gFOBT) and fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), evaluate the stool for blood, which may be present if there is bleeding from a colorectal cancer (or other source) Typically, primary care doctors will talk to their patients about colon cancer screening when they turn 45 or 50, depending on which guidelines they follow, Dr. Gaidos says. The test is ordered and you receive a kit to collect your stool. The sample can be returned by mail or dropped off at a lab or your doctor's office The PCR types stool tests requires about 1-3 cells for detection. PCR testing tests for bacteria, parasites, and viruses in the stool to look for infections that may be causing patient symptoms. The PCR types stool tests also allows you to look for Gastrointestinal Inflammatory Markers (markers of inflammation in your GI tract) and Antibiotic.

Colon Cancer and Poop: Signs to Watch Out Fo

No blood test can tell you if you have colon cancer. But your doctor may test your blood for clues about your overall health, such as kidney and liver function tests. Your doctor may also test your blood for a chemical sometimes produced by colon cancers (carcinoembryonic antigen, or CEA) There are currently three standard types of at-home stool screening tests for colon cancer, according to the CDC. The guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT). This type of test uses the chemical guaiac to detect blood in the stool. The at-home test kit includes a small stick or brush, which is used to obtain a small stool sample

Stool Tests for Colorectal Cancer Kaiser Permanent

Several test options can be used for colorectal cancer screening. They fall into 2 main types of tests: Stool-based tests look for signs of cancer (or polyps) in a person's stool (feces). Visual exams look at the inside of the colon and rectum for abnormal areas that might be cancer (or polyps) Busting myths about colorectal or colon cancer, the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. Myth. A colonoscopy is the only way to screen for COVID cancer. [RIPS] Fact. Other tests, such as an at-home stool test or a virtual colonoscopy can be used to screen for colon cancer Colon cancer screening can detect polyps and early cancers in the large intestine. This type of screening can find problems that can be treated before cancer develops or spreads. Regular screenings may reduce the risk for death and complications caused by colorectal cancer. There are 3 basic tests for colon cancer; a stool test (to check for.

Stool Test Types and Options - Verywell Healt

An UpToDate review on Tests for screening for colorectal cancer: Stool tests, radiologic imaging and endoscopy (Doubeni, 2016) states that Cologuard has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2014, as a screening test for colorectal carcinoma to be followed, when abnormal, by diagnostic colonoscopy • All patients should be aware that stool tests are a recommended screening option, along with invasive exams like colonoscopy. When given a choice, a significant number of patients prefer stool tests. In addition, access to colonoscopy and other invasive tests may be limited or non-existent for many patients Find more information on taking a stool test. Colonoscopy: A colonoscopy is an exam of the inner lining of the rectum and the entire colon to check for colon cancer, polyps, and inflammation. The test uses a flexible, lighted tube that is about the width of your finger. The exam takes anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour Multitarget stool DNA testing for colorectal-cancer screening. Imperiale TF, Ransohoff DF, Itzkowitz SH, Levin TR, Lavin P, Lidgard GP, Ahlquist DA, Berger BM. New England Journal of Medicine. Supplement to: Multitarget stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer screening Fecal DNA tests are used to look in stool for genetic material from a cancer. Genetic stool tests are often combined with fecal immunochemical tests for blood (FIT-DNA tests) and are done every 3 years. People who have a positive FIT-DNA test should get a follow-up colonoscopy within 6 months to reduce the risk of missing an advanced colon cancer

Study finds stool test effective for detecting colon cancer

How a stool test can help find colorectal cancer

How Accurate are the non-invasive Stool Tests? There are two types of stool tests for colon cancer: Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) and Stool DNA (Cologuard®). FIT detects 70% of colon cancers and 30% of large colorectal polyps. Stool DNA/Cologuard® detects 92% of cancers and 42% of large colorectal polyps Stool test is usually performed to detect the presence of any type of bacteria or parasites that are present in the intestine and infecting the gut. Gastroenterologists can diagnose any variety of diseases by analyzing the changes in the stools color, consistency, pH balance and the presence of fats A fecal occult blood test is done primarily to detect colon cancer in people without intestinal symptoms. Cancers of the colon are common and frequently produce fecal occult blood long before they cause other symptoms such as abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, or changes in bowel habits.In addition, some precursors of colon cancer, specifically, some types of colon polyps, also may bleed slowly. Types of colon cancer screening. Several tests can be used to find polyps or colon cancer. You can do some of them at home; others require a clinic setting due to the type of technology involved. At-home tests are stool-based, whereas tests done in a clinic allow for direct visualization of the colon. Colonoscopy: in-clinic test

Screening for Colorectal Cancer - Screening OptionsFecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT): Uses, Procedure, ResultsCDC Vital Signs - Colorectal Cancer Tests Save LivesSerum-Based DNA Methylation Biomarkers in Colorectal

When given a choice, most individuals with an average risk of colorectal cancer said they would prefer a stool-based screening test for colorectal cancer over colonoscopy, the method most often. Screening is the best way of finding colorectal cancer early. Most people ages 50 to 74 are at average risk of getting colorectal cancer, meaning they do not have a first-degree relative (parent, brother, sister or child) who has been diagnosed with colorectal cancer. It is recommended that people at average risk get screened with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) every 2 years February 02, 2021 Delaying colonoscopy after abnormal stool test increases risk of colorectal cancer, VA study finds Colorectal cancer is the third-most common cancer in the U.S., but also one of. Stool-based tests: Non-invasive options for screening include stool-based and radiographic testing. We recommend discussing with your doctor which test is best for you. These tests can usually be taken at home and with a small sample of feces it can detect blood or molecular markers which may indicate the presence of a cancer or polyp in the colon The new screening recommendations include two types of tests to detect polyps and early signs of colorectal cancer: colonoscopies and stool-based tests. A colonoscopy is an examination of the colon and rectum using a thin, flexible tube with a camera that allows a gastroenterologist to check for polyps or cancer growing inside the intestinal tract The type of tests for colorectal cancer will vary depending on the symptoms. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer is possible through a screening test called the faecal occult blood test (FOBT). The FOBT looks for blood in stool samples, possibly caused by polyps and early symptoms of colorectal cancer