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Ford Pinto memo

In other words, the Pinto was considered a deathtrap on four wheels. Now the conspiracy begins. Ford was fully aware of all these construction problems. However, people didn't know that until Mother Jones magazine published a stolen copy of an infamous memo that was sent out to all senior management at the Ford Motor Company The Pinto Memo, which contains these dirty numbers, was allegedly circulated among Ford's senior management in 1968, two years before the Pinto hit the streets and caused a number of. Ford's decision was based on the results of a cost-benefit analysis contained in the notorious 'Pinto Memo,' written by Ford engineers to guide design decisions. The Math The memo compared two sets of calculations, one for benefits to society of the rollover standard and one for the costs to society of implementing the rollover standard The Ford Pinto is a car that became notoriously associated with fuel-fed crash fires in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when the compact vehicle showed a propensity for catching fire when involved in even low-speed crashes. In 1977, an internal memo revealed that Ford was aware of design problems with the Pinto that made it more susceptible to crash-related fires, but that it had deemed the.

Between 1971 and 1978, the Pinto was responsible for a number of fire-related deaths. Ford puts the figure at 23; its critics say the figure is closer to 500. According to the sworn testimony of Ford engineers, 95 percent of the fatalities would have survived if Ford had located the fuel tank over the axle (as it had done on its Capri automobiles) The main controversy surrounding the Ford Pinto case was The Ford Motor Company's choices made during development to compromise safety for efficiency and profit maximization. More specifically, it was Ford's decision to use the cost/benefit analysis detailed in section 11 to make production decisions that translated into lost lives

Ford's decision was based on the results of a cost-benefit analysis contained in the notorious Pinto Memo, written by Ford engineers to guide design decisions. Incredibly, the analysis put a price tag on human life—$200,000— and then used that number to compare Ford's projected cost of settling burn-victim's lawsuit The Ford Pinto | The American Museum of Tort Law. Grimshaw v. Ford Motor Company, 1981. The Pinto, a subcompact car made by Ford Motor Company, became infamous in the 1970s for bursting into flames if its gas tank was ruptured in a collision. The lawsuits brought by injured people and their survivors uncovered how the company rushed the Pinto.

On June 9, 1978, Ford agreed to recall 1.5 million Ford Pinto and 30,000 Mercury Bobcat sedan and hatchback models. Iacocca was fired the following month. It was too late to save Ford's reputation. The so-called Pinto Memo was touted as an example of corporate callousness, at a time when corporations were being called onto the carpet for dumping toxic chemicals or allowing poison gas to kill thousands in India . Ford made themselves a convenient target

The Ford Pinto is a subcompact car that was manufactured and marketed by Ford Motor Company in North America from the 1971 to the 1980 model years. The smallest American Ford vehicle since 1907, the Pinto was the first subcompact vehicle produced by Ford in North America. The Pinto was marketed in three body styles through its production: a two-door fastback sedan with a trunk, a three-door. Ford Pinto: An Ethical Analysis. The Ford Pinto was rushed into production in August of 1970 by Ford's new president, Lee Iacocca, insisting that without a suitable alternative to the VW Beetle the Japanese would capture the entire American subcompact market. Iacocca ordered the development of the Pinto to be designed within an unusually. Ford Pinto Cost/Benefit Memo . Click here to view the Ford Pinto Cost/Benefit Memo ← Ford Removes Safety from Service Bulletin; Ford Delays Safety Upgrade Until Required By Law.

The Ford Pinto Memo: the Cost to Repair Vs the Cost of

Ford made a decision to place-money ahead of human lives‚ Robinson says‚ waving an Aug. 26‚ 1971‚ fuel system integrity memorandum. That damning piece of evidence advised Ford executives not to recall or re-design the Pinto until required by law. Thirty years later‚ Robinson charges‚ little has changed So the Ford Pinto went on sale with dangerous design faults in the position of the fuel tank and nearby bolts, and the tendency for the fuel valve to leak in rollover accidents. Design and production was rushed and cost of the vehicle kept down to sell it at $2000. It sold well, until 1972 when four people died ,the first of many incidents. This memo has nothing to do with the Ford Pinto. The clay models for the Pinto were finalized in Dec. 1968, which means that engineering for the gas tank & chassis could not have been completed. No testing could possibly have been done when this memo was allegedly circulated. The Pinto sold some 2 million units, not the 11 million cited in. Looking for a subcompact to counter the market onslaught from Japanese and European automakers, Ford Motor Company began work on the model that would become the Pinto in 1967. By December 1968, the basic design concept was approved by Ford Product Planning, but there was a catch: Lee Iacocca wanted the Pinto to be in dealer showrooms by the 1971 model year, condensing the typical 43-month. The Pinto was born with instructions from Iacocca that it be limited to 2,000 pounds in weight and be manufactured and sold for no more than $2,000 per car. And it was a hit when first released. Sadly - it also quickly became infamous. It burst into flames if struck from behind by another vehicle. Thankfully, those injured by Ford's.

Ford knows the Pinto is a firetrap, yet it has paid out millions to settle damage suits out of court, and it is prepared to spend millions more lobbying against safety standards The real legacy of the Ford Pinto is suffering and death. It is the ultimate cautionary tale of corporate greed. And so, to celebrate the Pinto is to celebrate human suffering. The Ford Pinto is perhaps the most dangerous car ever created. A series of design defects caused the car to burst into flames in low-speed collisions In this report, known as the Pinto memo, it was revealed that the Environmental and Safety Engineering division at Ford came to the conclusion that it was cheaper to not spend the $11 to reduce the fire risk on all the cars, and instead pay for the injuries the car caused on a case by case basis

The Pinto Memo: 'It's Cheaper to let them Burn!' The

Two Famous Corporate Memos: World Bank Pollution & The Ford Pinto . I. Cost-Benefit Analysis: World Bank Pollution Memo. Memo from Lawrence Summers, the CEO of World Bank: Just between you and me, shouldn't the World Bank be encouraging more migration of the dirty industries to the LDCs [less developed countries]? . . The infamous Pinto Memo was misrepresented by Mother Jones. It did NOT calculate the cost of making changes to the Pinto's fuel tank versus the cost of paying out settlements from lawsuits. The memo was a cost-benefit analysis of a particular federal regulation, and Ford was REQUIRED to perform that analysis by the federal government This evidence suggests that the infamous Ford Pinto Memo was truly a memo for the National Highway Transportation Safety Bureau (NHTSA) which displays the cost-benefit analysis for new roll-over safety measures for the entire automotive industry. The number of deaths and injuries resulting from all cars within the U.S. in regards to roll-over. Two Famous Corporate Memos: World Bank Pollution & The Ford Pinto . Cost-Benefit Analysis: World Bank Pollution Memo; Memo from Lawrence Summers, the CEO of World Bank: Just between you and me, shouldn't the World Bank be encouraging more migration of the dirty industries to the LDCs [less developed countries]? . . . The measurement of the costs of health-impairing pollution depends on. Ford Memo • Since the design of the Pinto was done 1967-70, the memo could not have afected design and development • Did not specifically mention the Pinto; it was an analysis of the risks and costs of proposed fuel safety requirements • Was about ALL 11,000,000 cars sold in the United States, not specifically the Pinto • Ford did not establish the $200,000 per life metric; it was.

This internal memo from the Ford Motor Company (known as the Ford Pinto Memo) compares the cost of repairing the flawed Pintos versus paying for death and injury settlements. Search streaming video, audio, and text content for academic, public, and K-12 institutions. Alexander Street is an imprint of ProQuest that promotes teaching, research. Ford was FULLY aware of the construction problems. A stolen copy of a memo sent out to all of the senior management at the Ford Motor Company was later published describing just how much Ford knew about the problems with the Pinto. I won't bore you with the minutia of the memo, so I'll list the relevant details from it

It became known as the Ford Pinto memo, a smoking gun. But Schwartz looked into that, too. He reported the memo did not pertain to Pintos or any Ford products. Instead, it had to do with. The real legacy of the Ford Pinto is suffering and death. It is the ultimate cautionary tale of corporate greed. And so, to celebrate the Pinto is to celebrate human suffering. The Ford Pinto is perhaps the most dangerous car ever created. A series of design defects caused the car to burst into flames in low-speed collisions

The Ford Pinto's gasoline tank was located behind the rear axle. In a rear-end collision of about twenty-eight miles per hour or more, the rear of the car would be crushed. However, a Ford memo recommended that rather than making any voluntary safety changes, Ford should wait until 1976 when the government was expected to introduce new. The Pinto is at the end of one of autodom's most notorious paper trails, the Ford Pinto memo , which ruthlessly calculates the cost of reinforcing the rear end ($121 million) versus the. The Car Talk blog describes why the memo proved so damning. In it, Ford's director of auto safety estimated that equipping the Pinto with [an] $11 part would prevent 180 burn deaths, 180 serious. A reproduced version of the Pinto memo. Sounds shocking, right? The memo, replicated above, was part of a report that Ford had drafted at the request of the National Highway Traffic Safety.

The Pinto is at the end of one of autodom's most notorious paper trails, the Ford Pinto memo , which ruthlessly calculates the cost of reinforcing the rear end ($121 million) versus the potential payout to victims ($50 million) One memo, marked confidential, reportedly shows that Ford executives knew in 1971 that an $8 part would reduce fire risks in the Pinto significantly, but recommended saving $20.9 million by.

The Ford Pinto - Bluefield Process Safet

The Pinto was a very successful car for Ford, but things took a turn in the middle of the decade. Some Pintos caught fire here and there, which led to an NHTSA investigation in 1974 and the eventual publication (in 1977) of Ford's Pinto Memo. Some 117 lawsuits impacted Ford by the time everyone was said and done Ford Pinto by Reflection. 1. Quality Management System Failure of all time: Ford Pinto Prepared By: Reflection. 2. Md.Mostakim Sobhan Raihan Id no.091406. 3. Company History of Ford Pinto In the 1970s, the Ford Pinto is most well-known and the worst disaster Ford Motor Company is an American automaker and the world's 5th largest automaker. Ford figured that it would be cheaper to pay out damages to the families of people who were hurt or killed when their Pinto blew up than it would be to recall the vehicles. An inner company memo was found and published by Mother Jones Magazine. The memo outlined the following The Pinto Memo wasn't used or consulted internally by Ford, but rather was attached to a letter written to NHTSA about proposed regulation. When plaintiffs tried to use the memo in support of punitive damages, the trial judge ruled it inadmissible for that purpose (p. 1021, Schwartz study)

Ford memo: the smoking gun Beasley Allen Law Fir

  1. Ford Motor Company knew the dangers of the Ford Pinto, and conducted a cost/benefit analysis of releasing the car to the market as-is, or releasing it only after doing the necessary modifications. In the memo, Ford Estimated 180 burn deaths, 180 serious burn injuries, and 2100 burned out vehicles (In reality the Pinto is blamed for over 9,000.
  2. The Ford Pinto-Ethics. Clearly, Ford's CEO Iacocca was an Egoist. People were definitely considered morally irrelevant in his decision-making framework. The Pinto safety issue was evaluated utilizing a Utilitarian framework motivated by the CEO's Egoism. From a risk management standpoint, this may be the most dangerous combination in a.
  3. Ignoring the terrible design, weak performance and lack of luxury for a moment, the Pinto's biggest drawback was that it tended to catch on fire during low speed rear-end collisions. In what is one of the most infamous settlements, the Ford Pinto Memo, Ford had to shell out $50 million for the victims and their families
  4. The Ford Pinto Myth? Edit. The Ford Pinto is constantly brought up as an example of poor business ethics. However, later studies have made the claim that the case was a misunderstanding. In regards to the Pinto memo, the public was led to believe that this was an internal Ford document
  5. Grimshaw v. Ford Motor Company (119 Cal.App.3d 757, 174 Cal.Rptr. 348) was a personal injury tort case decided in Orange County, California in February 1978 and affirmed by a California appellate court in May 1981. The lawsuit involved the safety of the design of the Ford Pinto automobile, manufactured by the Ford Motor Company.The jury awarded plaintiffs $127.8 million in damages, the largest.
  6. Ford Pinto Case Ethical Issues. On August 10, 1978 three young girls died in a 1973 Ford Pinto after being stuck from the rear by a driver in a van. The Ford Pinto was completely engulfed in flames and the accident resulted in the death of the three young girls. Today, the debate continues regarding whether or not The Ford Motor Company was.
  7. ance of American automakers' share of the market, Ford designed the Pinto as a viable alternative

Case: The Ford Pinto Business Ethic

Utilitarianism and The Ford Pinto Case Introduction Business is concerned primarily with profit. To earn a profit, a business produces goods or provides services and engages in buying and selling. According to the myth, however, businesses and people in business are not explicitly concerned with ethics FORD PINTO MEMO ON COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF BURN VICTIMS. C AR L O S D EL VAL L E MARTIN EZ J AWAD M. SID D IQ U I. Goals of the study Study estimates of fire deaths in road accidents made by both the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) and NSC (National Safety Council) to justify their subsequent use in the CBA Later on, the Pinto memo was publicized, which proved the company concluded it was cheaper to settle victims' lawsuits ($50 million) than to recall and fix the cars ($120 million). Aptly, the coda to the Pinto's story is the car's presence in American Museum of Tort Law.

Кейс Ford Pinto

The Ford Pinto Case

Mother Jones magazine, got hold of a copy of the cost/benefit analysis which revealed Ford comparing the cost of $11 repair against the cost of paying off potential law suits, which is known as the Ford Pinto memo. Is amazing that ford failed to adhere to moral compass to carry out proper ethical decision instead they took a wrong approach This internal memo from the Ford Motor Company (known as the Ford Pinto Memo) compares the cost of repairing the flawed Pintos versus paying for death and injury settlements. Notes Title from resource description page (viewed Apr. 21, 2014)

It took a week going through those files for Dowie to unearth a Ford memo entitled Fatalities Associated with Crash-Induced Fuel Leakage and Fires. In it, Ford's director of auto safety estimated that equipping the Pinto with the $11 part would prevent 180 burn deaths, 180 serious burn injuries and 2,100 burned cars, for a total cost of $137. The document became known as the Ford Pinto Memo.[17][14][18] An example of a Pinto rear-end accident that led to a lawsuit was the 1972 accident resulted in the court case Grimshaw v. Ford Motor Co.,[19] in which the California Court of Appeal for the Fourth Appellate District upheld compensatory damages of $2.5 million and punitive damages of. Ford knows the Pinto is a firetrap, yet it has paid out millions to settle damage suits out ofcourt, and it is prepared to spend millions more lobbying against safety standards A notorious internal memo at Ford indicated that better protecting the fuel tank would cost about $11 per Pinto over its production run, but that it would be cheaper for the company to pay. The Ford Pinto Case Milton Friedman believed a free-market system, in which goods and services are exchanged and controlled by individuals and privately-owned businesses without government authority, was the only way to achieve personal freedom. Adam Smith, a 18th century philosopher and economist, held the belief that in a free society, the.

The 17 Best Bad Cars Ever BuiltJunkyard Find: 1974 Ford Pinto - The Truth About CarsHUMBULs-heart-is-not-so-humble-1200hp-twinturbo-26b-4rotor

  1. The Ford Pinto is a subcompact car that was manufactured and marketed by Ford Motor Company in North America, sold from the 1971 to the 1980 model years. The smallest American Ford vehicle since 1907, the Pinto was the first subcompact vehicle produced by Ford in North America; the Pinto was also the first mass-produced American car sold with rack and pinion steering
  2. al charges
  3. Mother Jones magazine obtained the cost-benefit analysis that it said Ford had used to compare the cost of an $11 repair against the cost of paying off potential law suits, in what became known as the Ford Pinto Memo. The characterization of Ford's design decision as gross disregard for human lives in favor of profits led to major lawsuits.
  4. Mother Jones Magazine obtained the cost-benefit analysis that it said Ford had used to compare the cost of an $11 repair against the monetary value of a human life, in what became known as the Ford Pinto memo. The characterization of Ford's design decision as gross disregard for human lives in favor of profits led to significant lawsuits. While.

The Ford Pinto - The American Museum of Tort La

Do you remember the infamous Ford Pinto Memo? Basically, Ford knew that Pinto had a defect. Basically, Ford knew that Pinto had a defect. However, after calculating what Ford would pay for accidents caused by the defect, Ford concluded it was mathematically better to leave the problem as is because it would save $70 million The Fnord memo was about the cost of modifing all american cars, not just Pintos, see wikipedia. The supposed design fault (uncommon in larger American cars) was having the fuel tank between the rear bumper and the rear axle. Anyone who had a mark 3 or 4 Cortina, or a mark 1 or 2 Escort, would recognise this arrangement Essay Ford Motor Company Memo. Ford Motor Company is an American automaker, it is the world's fifth largest automaker based on worldwide vehicle sales. Its headquarters are based in Dearborn, Michigan, which is a suburb in Detroit. Henry Ford founded Ford Motor Company on June 16, 1903 and it became one of the largest and most profitable. The Ford Pinto - Business Ethics Case Study. CASE 2.2. 1. Although the Pinto passed the NHTSA test, Ford officials knew that the Pinto was prone to catch fire when struck from the rear, even in low-speed collisions, thus it was unsafe to drive the car without any technical improvements implemented. Yet, Ford's management decided to ignore the. Ford Pinto Life span: 1971-1980. Images of flaming Pintos are so seared into the public consciousness that it's probably hard for most people, unaided by a photograph, to conjure a mental image of.

4. The Ford Pinto recall Source: Ford. Introduced for 1971, the Pinto was designed to take on the rising tide of imports that had come to dominate the entry-level market. For a time, the car was a major success, selling 328,275 cars in its first year on sale. But the Pinto had a fatal flaw, and Ford knew about it all along Business Ethics. Module 1: Why does business need ethics? Case: The Ford Pinto. The Ford Pinto and the Dominant View. Reading: Friedman - The Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits. Understanding Friedman's thesis. Friedman's Justification for Stockholder Theory. Reading: Freeman - Managing for Stakeholders the Ford Pinto caseIncorporate three specific laws (e.g. contract, tort) that apply to the corporate decisions in this case. Discuss how the philosophy of economist Milton Friedman may have influenced the employees, executives/managers of the company. Discuss Ford or Lee Iacocca moral responsibilities to stakeholders and to the safety of customers. In addition, identify an ethical [ Ford Motor Co. plaintiffs before trial[65][66] Mark Dowie's investigative article, Pinto Madness published in Mother Jones emphasized the emotional aspects of the Grush-Saundy memo and implied Ford was callously trading lives for profits [67] (the article suggested 500-900 deaths[68])

Ford 100: Defective Pinto almost took Ford's reputation

Two Famous Corporate Memos: World Bank Pollution & The Ford Pinto. Cost-Benefit Analysis: World Bank Pollution Memo. Memo from Lawrence Summers, the CEO of World Bank: Just between you and me, shouldn't the World Bank be encouraging more migration of the dirty industries to the LDCs [less developed countries]? . . claim, that it was the internal (20, 24) memo on which Ford based its decision to market the dangerous Pinto and set-tle the few inevitable lawsuits (31). 2. The Pinto narrative is well-known outside academia as well. A Dow Corning employee's 1980 memo, cited in The case of the Ford Pinto, and its alleged tendency to explode in rear-end collisions, provided the occasion for what is universally hailed as our product liability system's finest triumph. Everyone knows that Ford engineers realized the car was defective but decided (in a smoking-gun memo unearthed by trial lawyers) that it would be cheaper to pay off death claims than to change the design Bhopal, Three Mile Island, and the Ford Pinto all were preceded by memos unsent or unread. Vision Software is losing out because it operates in a culture of exclusion

Living Stingy: The Ford Pinto - An Example of Media Hysteri

  1. The case of the Ford Pinto, and its alleged tendency to explode in rear-end collisions, provided the occasion for what is universally hailed as our product liability system's finest triumph. Everyone knows that Ford engineers realized the car was defective but decided (in a smoking-gun memo unearthed by trial lawyers) that it would be cheaper.
  2. TABLE: THE COST OF DYING IN A PINTO These figures are from a Ford Motor Co. internal memorandum on the benefits and costs of an $11 safety improvement (applicable to all vehicles with similar gas tank designs) that would have made the Pinto less likely to burn. BENEFITS Savings: 180 burn deaths, 180 serious burn injuries, 2,100 burned vehicles
  3. g that it would be cheaper to pay.

Ford Pinto - Wikipedi

  1. A separate Ford memo recounts a plan to install higher-grade tires on new Explorers the company shipped to Saudi Arabia and to offer recent Explorer buyers the option of upgrading their original tires from Ford's World-wide . The Ford-Firestone Case Professors Pinedo, Seshadri, Zemel
  2. After the historical sketch, the course proceeds to the analysis of claims made about the safety of the Pinto. The purpose of Ford's crash tests, the intent and actual use of the notorious Pinto Memo, the justification for using cost-benefit analysis, the impossibility of achieving absolute safety, and the actual safety record of the.
  3. A Utilitarian Argument in the Ford Pinto Case. Categories: Arguments Car Utilitarianism. Download paper. Download. Essay, Pages 6 (1442 words) Views. 1281. In 1971 Ford Motor Company decided they wanted to create a compact car that could compete with the other Japanese manufactured cars. It rushed from its inception to its actual production

Ford Pinto: An Ethical Analysis The Business Schola

He pointed out that an earlier case involving Ford Pinto gas tanks resulted in $125 million in punitive damages, which later was reduced to $3.5 million. But the memo was kept away from juries. Inspiration Material: 1974 Ford Pinto - Okay, This Ain't Bad At All! I've managed to grow up past the old kaboom jokes and other one-liners about Ford Pintos. Looking at them subjectively, if it hadn't been for the discovery of what is known as the Pinto memo (the cost-benefit analysis that Ford used to justify not making a.

PPT - Ethics: Case Studies PowerPoint Presentation, freeThe biggest motoring scandals

The Ford Pinto in which they were riding was hit from the rear and burst into flames. In its simplest form, the state is charging that the company knowingly made and marketed a dangerous product The Pinto proved vulnerable in rear-end collisions, where ruptured fuel tanks led to a number of fatal fires. After a leaked memo showed Ford executives weighing the cost of a recall against prospective settlements with accident victims, Ford became a case study in corporate insensitivity. By the end of the decade, the Pinto was a morbid joke The name is also involved in Ford's infamous paper trails, known as Ford Pinto memo, which determined that the potential payout to victims ($50 million) is more cost-effective than reinforcing the rear end ($121 million). 6# Triumph TR7 (1975) Triumph TR7 1975 To make matters worse, Ford decided-in its infamous cost-benefit analysis of the situation that became known as the Ford Pinto Memo-that paying off the cost of settlements for the victims ($50 million) was more financially beneficial than recalling and reinforcing the car's rear ends ($121 million). Done The girls were riding in their Ford Pinto when it was rear-ended. The doors on the Pinto slammed shut, the gas tank split open, gas leaked out, caught fire and the girls were incinerated. Cosentino had been reading about a 1973 memo that Ford executives had written about the Pinto gas tank problem. In the memo, Ford put a price o